GPs receive medal for on-the-spot medical care

Dr Mike Kay: Always availlable to to help the Ambulance Service at accidents or emergencies out of hours if they request help. Picture: Susann Brown
Dr Mike Kay: Always availlable to to help the Ambulance Service at accidents or emergencies out of hours if they request help. Picture: Susann Brown

Two local GP’s who volunteer their time to give life-saving pre-hospital emergency care, have been awarded the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal.

Dr Mike Kay from Insch and Dr Alastair Glennie from Kemnay are among eight medical practitioners from Aberdeen City and Shire to have received this accolade at the recent BASICS (British Association of Immediate Care Scotland) conference.

Dr Alaistair Glennie: To save and preserve life is the reason for becoming a doctor. Picture: Susann Brown

Dr Alaistair Glennie: To save and preserve life is the reason for becoming a doctor. Picture: Susann Brown

BASICS Scotland is a charity that was set up to provide training and responders to pre-hospital emergencies. Doctors, and generally rural GPs volunteer to be available to attend emergencies with and on behalf of the Scottish Ambulance service. The volunteer doctors assist paramedics, for example, if someone is trapped in a car crash, or if there is going to be a delay in getting a paramedic to a life threatening 999 call in the target time.

The volunteers who have been trained to do this have been equipped ‘Sandpiper Bag’ costing more than £1000. Kemnay GP, Dr Alastair Glennie explained: “A GP can often get to a patient quicker than an ambulance, and most of my 999 calls are because the local Inverurie crew are either busy or in Aberdeen which means there can be a delay in getting help to life threatening illnesses or accidents. Ambulances are valuable scarce resources and it is impossible to have one on every corner just in case, this is where BASICS doctors can help out in rural areas.

“I was honoured to receive the Queens Jubilee Medal. I volunteer to assist the ambulance service as I feel it is part of being the local GP. To save and preserve life is why we decide to become doctors and it gives me a sense of helping those who need it most at a time when life is very vulnerable.

Dr Mike Hay added: “I was honoured to receive The Queens Diamond Jubilee Medal. Having been provided with a car transponder and equipment through The Sandpiper Trust I am available to help the Ambulance Service at accidents or emergencies out of hours. I am always hugely impressed by the skill and professionalism of the Ambulance and Fire Services and am happy to provide medical back up if they require it.”

Both doctors expressed gratitude to BASICS Scotland and the Sandpiper Trust for all their work.