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Plane recreates first flight from Cruden Bay beach to Norway

Crowds watch below as two planes fly over Cruden Bay to mark 100 years since the first flight to Norway.

Crowds watch below as two planes fly over Cruden Bay to mark 100 years since the first flight to Norway.

Two low-flying aircraft flew past Cruden Bay on Wednesday to mark the centenary of the first flight between the North-east village and Norway.

On July 30, 1914, Tryggve Gran flew his Bleriot X1-2 craft from Cruden Bay to Norway, completing the journey in a time of four hours and ten minutes.

On Wedneday, to mark the historic occasion, Per Hoyland and Hakon Fasso flew a British microlight plane from Cruden Bay to Jaren, just south of Stavanger in Norway, using a traditional compass.

This was followed by flypast from a second plane which was carrying Mr Gran’s son, Hermann, and a number of Norwegian dignitaries.

Speaking prior to the flight, Mr Hoyland said that he anticipated completing the flight in around the same time as had been done back in 1914.

The flight, which has been a year in the planning, saw the pair carry a special limited bottle of Trygvve Gran whisky - one of only 60 bottles of the special blend still in existence.

Mr Hoyland added: “The people of Cruden Bay have been great and have helped us get the plane here.

“They’ve been so happy that we are doing this.

“They have played an important role inmaking the flight possible.”

The special centenary will be celebrated by the village later this month as part of the Port Erroll Harbour Fish Festival, which is being held on Saturday, August 23, from 10am til late.

There will be a variety of stalls, music and a special visit from a Norwegian dignitary throughout the day followed by a fantastic fireworks display.

 

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